Did you find an injured, ill or possibly orphaned animal?  Click on the animal name below to learn what to do in the most common situations before bringing them to Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital…

Bats
Bats
Birds
Birds
Coyotes
Coyotes
Opossums
Opossums
Orphaned Wildlife
Orphaned wildlife
Rabbits
Rabbits
Raccoons
Raccoons
Reptiles
Reptiles
Skunks
Skunks
Squirrels
Squirrels
Waterfowl
Waterfowl
White Tailed Deer
White Tailed Deer

General FAQ’s

What are Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital Hours?

Regular hours: M-F 9 a.m. -6 p.m. & Sa-Su 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Holiday hours 9 a.m. – Noon (hours subject to change)

Where is Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital located?

2661 Billingsley Road, Columbus, OH 43235. We are located on the lower level of Animal Care Unlimited (2665 Billingsley Rd.) Please use side door and follow the steps downstairs.

I brought an animal to Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital; will I be updated on the status?

If you checked the box on the admission form that you would like to be contacted regarding the FINAL disposition of the animal, a staff member from Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital will contact you regarding the animals’ outcome. We do not give updates on the animals during treatment, as we receive nearly 5,000 injured, orphaned or ill wild animals each year.

If the wild animal is not injured, but a nuisance, who do I contact?

Contact SCRAM! Wildlife Control at 614-763-0696, or fill out an online request form. SCRAM! is a service of Ohio Wildlife Center, providing non-lethal human-wildlife conflict resolutions to home and business owners. All proceeds from SCRAM! services support Ohio Wildlife Center. This is a fee-based service; please call SCRAM for an estimate.

I am concerned about a lost, abused or injured domestic animal, who do I contact?

Please contact the Humane Society or Shelter in the county where the animal was found.

What do I do if a cat, dog or another animal attacks or has the wild animal in question its mouth?

In any of these instances, the animal should be brought to Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital during open hours for evaluation. The animal will be evaluated by trained hospital volunteers or staff upon intake. If it appears unharmed from the attack, we will return the animal to you for re-uniting. All wild animals attacked by cats will REQUIRE hospitalization. There is always a possibility of unseen injury such as tiny puncture wounds which may lead to infection, crushing, which may cause internal injury, or shaking which may cause neurological damage to the animal.

I am interested in treating or raising an injured wild animal, can you tell me how to care for it?

In Ohio it is illegal for anyone to possess a wild-caught native or game animal without proper permits from the Ohio Division of Wildlife and/or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (even if you intend to release it later). These regulations make it illegal for an Ohio wildlife Center volunteer or staff to instruct a person without the proper permits to care for a wild animal in their possession. There is high demand for raising and caring for wild animals, but also potential health risks. For example, hatchling birds need to be fed every 10 minutes from sunrise to sunset and raccoons shed a parasite that has the potential to be fatal to humans if proper cleaning regimens are not followed. If you found an injured or orphaned wild animal, contact the nearest licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Are there any species that Ohio Wildlife Center does not accept for rehabilitation?

Ohio wildlife Center’s Hospital does not accept domestic ducks or geese. A domestic duck or goose must be taken to a regular veterinarian (you must assume financial responsibility). Animal Care Unlimited (614-766-2317), located above Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital treats domestic and exotic birds. No rehabilitation of mute swans is allowed in the state of Ohio (as of winter 2008). These are a non-native species and many people keep them for ornamental reasons or as a pet. All Mutes brought into the hospital must be euthanized in accordance with state law. For this reason, only admit the animal if it appears to be greatly suffering or debilitated. Minor injuries (scrapes and bruises) may be able to heal on their own given time. Alternatively, if the owner of the swan can be found, the animal may be taken to a licensed veterinarian for treatment.

Ohio Wildlife Center does not accept tame, hand-raised raccoons for rehabilitation OR placement. Many people find babies in the spring when they are young and will raise them at home without the proper permits or training. We usually start getting phone calls in the fall when the people can no longer handle the “tame” raccoons that are tearing up their homes or they are too busy to care for them because they are going back to school, etc. Please contact the Ohio Division of Wildlife at 1-800-WILDLIFE.

The State of Ohio does not permit rehabilitation of white-tailed deer. Severely injured deer may be admitted to Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital for euthanasia only. Reasonably, adult deer (with or without antlers) are very strong and dangerous; their sharp hooves can eviscerate a human with one well-placed kick. Adult deer are highly-stressed animals that do poor in captivity and often injure themselves while attempting to escape. This often leads to fatal injuries. A fawn that is walking around, bleating or crying, walking up to people or into garages, is a fawn in distress and may be orphaned. An orphaned fawn may also appear thin (ribs showing), or may have a large number of flies buzzing around it. It is illegal in the state of Ohio to rehabilitate white-tailed deer, including orphans. Please leave fawns where they were found for all attempts at re-uniting. If re-uniting fails or there is confirmation of a dead mother, the fawn may be admitted to Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital. Our only viable option for these cases is to attempt to foster these individuals into another herd with a lactating mother within the same county of origin. If fostering is not successful, the fawn must be euthanized according with state law.

Rehabilitation of coyotes is not permitted in the state of Ohio. All coyotes must be admitted to Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital for euthanasia only.